THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY AND CULTURE IS NOW OPEN

  

THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY AND CULTURE IS NOW OPEN

This Saturday (Sept. 24), history was made with the grand opening of the Smithsonian National Museum Of African American History and Culture. Established in 2003, the idea of a federally owned museum featuring African American history and culture can be traced back nearly 100 years.

Located at the National Mall in Washington, D.C., to commemorate its opening, a host of prominent individuals were in attendance like Stevie Wonder, Oprah Winfrey, Angela Bassett, and many more. President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama were also there, ringing a bell alongside a 99-year-old woman who is a descendant of slaves, to open the museum.
The bell from one of the oldest black churches in America rings in the official opening of @NMAAHC! #APeoplesJourney https://t.co/0je8MHEH7G

- The White House (@WhiteHouse) September 24, 2016

"This national museum helps to tell a richer and fuller story of who we are," Obama said in a speech. "Hopefully, this museum can help us to talk to each other. And more importantly, listen to each other. And most importantly, see each other. Black and white and Latino and Native American and Asian American - see how our stories are bound together.

With 36,000 items that trace the treacherous journey of African Americans from the slave trade of the 1800s to the racial tensions of the civil-rights movement in the 20th century. Former President George W. Bush, who signed the law authorizing the museum in 2003, said the museum tells the unvarnished truth of how a country built on the promise of liberty once held millions in chains. "It faces its flaws and corrects them," he expounds.

Rep. John Lewis also gave a moving speech during the ceremony. "It is important that The National Museum of African American History and Culture tells the unvarnished truth of America's history - a story that speaks to the soul of our nation, but one few Americans know," he said. "It's a reminder that 400 years of history can't be buried; its lessons must be learned. By bringing the uncomfortable parts of our past out of the shadows, we can better understand what divides us and seek to heal those problems through our unity."


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