2BrosShow The Podcast

Send a Message

Blogs RSS


The 2 Bros Show for
iPhone/iPad


The 2 Bros Show for
Android


Friends
This user does not have any friends yet...


About Me
The co-hosts of the #2BrosShow, @NavadaTaylor (Hulk BROgan) & @TobariFingal (The Brilliant BROfessor) are extremely excited about this new and innovative podcast... made BY CREATIVES, FOR CREATIVES. W... Read More


 

2BrosShow The Podcast


https://www.blackvibes.com/thebropack
 

My Blog


How to Build a QUALITY Home Studio Set Up

   

How to Build a QUALITY Home Studio Set Up

[if gte mso 9]> I [The BROfessor] have a home studio. THANK YOU, thankyou... please hold all of your applause until the end of the article. [#Modesty]Drum Roll Please... SOWHAT!!!So many guys have home-based to studios now;it's become a fad. However, when people come to my home studio (Haven HouseMusic Recording & Production Lab), or when I take them to other homestudios to which I'm associated, the response is usually the same, "WOW! Thisis really nice! I was expecting a lonely Mac laptop and some of those huge,wooden speakers you'd find on an old school stereo system circa 1982!" So what is the difference between whatthey thought might be in my studio, and what was actually there? There are three main components tocreating a great home studio that will not only be functional, but also keepyour clients coming back over and over... they are the FEEL, the GEAR, and theWORK ETHIC. Let's start with feel.Have you ever been to a home studio that'sin the basement of an unkempt house? You walk through the house to access thebasement (because the backyard is so shabby, you really can't walk through itif you wanted to.  You reach the studioonly to realize... it is no less dank, dark, and creepy than you'd expect abasement to be... it even has the added bonus of being just a tad bit smelly too.Given all these things, the gear was decent and the engineer was too. Nextquestion, did you go back? There is no doubt in my mind that most ofyou said, "No". Because you like so many others who have recorded for a whileunderstand that the ambiance is just as important as the engineer, or gear. Youcould easily record in a studio that was inviting, calm, and peaceful, even ifthe gear wasn't as good. A good engineer will know how to take not-so-goodequipment and make it sound amazing, leaving you (the artist) only having toconsider your performance and your vision. Providing your clients that right isparamount in bring new and repeat business back to your studio.  Now let's tackle the Gear.The simple reality is most of the clienteleyou'll have coming to a home studio will not be savvy enough to know what thehell does what in a studio at all, let alone YOUR home studio which, if it wasanything like my first studio, probably had so many "workarounds" that aseasoned engineer would have trouble putting your hardware together properly. Butthat doesn't mean your patron is completely ignorant. Here is the quickbreakdown of what is most important in a home studio and why.§ The Microphone: the mic is one of the first things aclient (or potential client) will ask about, or look for. It is the one thingthat any client will use to quickly identify if your studio is "quality" ornot. That being said, for those of us "in the know", I realize that the mic canbe an investment, but doesn't have to be the greatest mic ever made to soundamazing on it. Some voices sound great on a $100.00 MXL mic, but that cheap micmay look-like a cheap mic... so also having a higher end mic (or brand name mic) maygive you the right visuals that will keep clients coming back. §  ThePreamp: the preamp (ormic pre) needs to be a good quality one. A good quality mic pre is (in myopinion) even more important than a great mic because that same MXL mic willsound better coming through an Avalon vt737 for example, than going directlythrough the interface (albeit the interface may have a mic pre as a built infeature. With a (less than) decent mic, that signal coming into your DAW willbe of a poorer quality. Do your research here because what may be good for memay not be the best for you. Example: The Apogee Duet is a tiny two in,(one for mic, one for guitar), stereo out pre, that is a very high quality pre,although it doesn't give the "polished" studio look. Whereas the FocusriteOctoPre MkII 8-Channel Mic Preamp is a rack-mounted, 8 channel pre (as statedin the name), but is not as high quality mic pre as the Apogee. Either way,both of these items are at basically the same price point... meaning they cost aboutthe same. One gives you more options for recording in however, while the otheris limited but a much better brand and/or quality. Again, consider your ownneeds and do your research because this is also very much influenced bypersonal opinion.§ The Cables: Yes the cables MATTER! If the micmatters (because the signal starts with the mic), than, the cables running fromthe mic to your preamp/interface, also matters! This purchase adds absolutelyno "visual" effect at all, however, it does add in creating a better soundquality that your clients will love.  § The Room Treatment: The sound padding in you room is a greatway of ensuring that not only will people be pleased at what they see becausefoam gives that polished and expected studio look (even if they don't know whatit actually does), but, if done properly, will also counteract any of thereflection, room reverb, or echo problem that maybe present in your room, andwould distort your mixing ability. 


Send Blog   ·     Share on Facebook   ·     Bookmark on Delicious

The #1 Way to Be a Successful Producer

   

The #1 Way to Be a Successful Producer

[if gte mso 9]> Picture it... your city, USA... in the year ofour Lord, 20-"it doesn't really matter". You're making beats in your basement or bedroom... Afterbeing basically deafened by the "not so" amazing tracks of yours you've beenplaying in your noise-cancelling headphones for the last 2 and a half hours,you seem ready to give up the fight and charge into that PB&J with thecrust cut off you've been wanting, but trying to avoid because, like Pringles...you can't just have one. Suddenly, inspiration hit you like a pissed off BruceLee with nothing to lose! You fly to your laptop, crack open (insert DAW here), power up the midicontroller and... (20 mins. later) you have a hit track unlike anything that haseven been done, in the history of anything ever being done before... EVER!After jumping around the room a few timesand pounding your chest like your favorite football team just won the SuperBowl (and by some random happenstance, you had something to do with it), acrushing feeling comes over you knowing that EVERYONE needs to hear this but,NO ONE might because..."IHAVE NO IDEA HOW TO GET THIS TO THE PEOPLE WHO CAN GET IT OUT TO THE ARTISTS& SUBSEQUENTLY, THE GENERAL PUBLIC."Is that you?Hopefully not, but the stark reality isthat all of us at one point in our music careers or another go through this. Wecan dodge it for as long as we can but even the big producers can fall intothis, if they're not careful. That being said, you truly have failed only... ifyou've given up."Really!?Cause not getting any money, recognition, or even getting your props from your"fam." for such an EPIC track... sure feels like failure to me!"But that begs the question, "As aproducer, how can I be successful?"Full disclosure, I work a full-time jobcurrently and produce and record at my home studio on the side. Hopefully andprayerfully I intend on being in a very different place when you read this buteither way, the road to success (like the road to hell) is paved with goodintentions. So how can "WE" become successful as producers without being "shotto hell"?Here is what I've found from myexperiences so far:1.   Your "tracks" aren't good enough; 2.   Unless your name is (I), you belong in ateam and;3.   No one will work FOR you unless you havesomething to offer.Less break this down a bit shall we? Let's take the first point which is, your"tracks" are not good enough. I am not an ogre, I'm not making fun of where youmight be in your learning of music, your production skills, and such, but whatI mean is this. This industry is moving at the speed of sound, so you have tomake the shelf life of your music much longer by adding a song to it; soyour tracks are not good enough alone!It is easy to hear the potential in yourown music; seeing where it could go, what it could do or mean to someone, andwho could be doing their thing on it. However, every producer should keep inmind that this industry is run by NON MUSICAL PEOPLE. Executives, A&R,other label reps, managers, promoters... usually these are the guys that can makethings happen but are not the guys you want doing backgrounds on your latestEP.It is difficult for them to hear what youmean to do or say with the bare track, or hear "it" (it being whatever thatthing is that makes your vision so powerful to you), or envision who might beable to rock this the most. I've found that that power rest with artist andproducers especially! We "know" and have the vision for the music and are onlyinterrupted by "gnats" when we are told that our vision, our track, our musicis "flawed" or "underdeveloped". So... spell it out for them! Write (or have asong written) to all your worth-while (and even the not so worth-while) tracksand watch them come to life. Then when the exec., rep, etc. hears the music,they can make a better assessment of the true potential of the music. Oh, and mix whatever you're writing tobecause that will allow them no excuses to say, "NO".  Next let's tackle being in a team. I don'tsuppose that everyone is built to be in a team per say, however, even if youare a loner... making it up this mountain will require some "equipment". First,the Manager. Theirjob is to (drumroll please...) manage you, and all the aspects of you, manage andpresent you with opportunities, and present YOU to those opportunities;basically be your industry liaison. In a matter of speaking, they are like yourdoctor, and as such, they are essentially you're employee. They are supposed touse their industry connections, knowledge-base, and go-get-it-itudeness tosteer your career in a profitable direction.TheMix Engineer. Theirjob is to take what you've done and make it sound AMAZING. A great mix willmake possible mistakes sound purposeful and hide any unwanted "noise"


Send Blog   ·     Share on Facebook   ·     Bookmark on Delicious

   

Which Platform is the Best for Music Production, Mac or PC

[if gte mso 9]> I am not a very technical person when itcomes to computer use in general. In fact, I'm just old enough to have knownwhen the home computer was a "big deal" and having the internet was theweirdest thing to have in the home because it made that loud, mind-numbinglyannoying, simply ridiculous sound when you tried to go on AOL, also... there wasonly AOL (You know... with the CD's that came in the mail for free minutes)! In those days, I was a bit more interestedin being outside playing and acting a damn fool... meanwhile, my little brotherand sister both learned to type, search the web, and the more... my jump shot waskiller though [#useless]!I definitely learned those computer skillsa bit later, but I didn't learn it because I was interested... I learned out ofnecessity. What that means for me is now I have to continue to actively learn,and learn because necessity keeps following me like a stray cat follows theperson that consistently feeds him. What does this mean for the best platformfor producing music? Well first, it depends on whether you're a necessityperson, or an interest person.What I mean is this.If you're interested in how the computerworks, its various capabilities, and how to make it work better (or an interestperson), you might choose a PC to work from for creating your music. If youprefer to have something that is ready-made, plug & play, ready out of thebox (a necessity person), then a Macintosh maybe the right choice for you.  Let's break this down a bit further so weall understand the differences in platforms (...again, from a non-technicalperson, to other non-technical people).PC: This platform is good for those of uswho probably already have a Personal Computer (PC) and really would just needto purchase a DAW system to get started making music (or maybe find a torrentsite and a free download). [#shameful, #IMightHaveDoneThat, #DontJudgeMe]. Thisplatform allows for a quick start and easy proliferation of your music,speaking from a music creating standpoint. PC's are fully editable (from a hardwareperspective) meaning, if you don't like the soundcard that came with your PC atthe time of your purchase, you can easily change or swap it out for somethingelse. Don't like your visual card? Change that too! It's a bit difficult, but youcould swap out your whole motherboard if you wanted.MAC: This platform is great for folks like mewho are either technologically impaired, or just not very tech savvy. The ready"out of the box" medium that MAC offers is good for being able to just use it.Unlike what I've seen in other PC systems, MAC's come equipped with good softwarefor making music, visual arts, movies, and even websites, that are of a highenough quality, as a standard feature. MAC's in my opinion were tailored forthose of us in the Arts community, and since they have provided so much for usto use, it makes it really easy to learn quickly and effectively, withoutbreaking the bank on numerous other purchases. Each platform has a downside to it aswell. First, PC's are fully editable... but if you don't know the "who, what,when, where", and especially the "how's" of editing your PC, you will be quicklycalling your PC repair guy and spending some money on fixing a probably verysimple and avoidable mistake. Also, from virus control and prevention to theregular maintenance of a PC like defragging; you will sacrifice time; time youcould be making more music, or watching more of those pirated, newly releasedmovies from that torrent site you shouldn't be on.[#youshouldknowbetterthanthat]MAC's are not off the hook either.Although the iLife suite will provide you with enormous creating power, youwill need a small loan to purchase a MAC these days, or risk spending yourmoney on a used system, from a third-party site. Although you'll never have toworry about viruses, the software updates are so frequent and systemic, you'llbe surprised how often your other software may be left inactive or become outdatedbecause it's missing a vital plugin to be able to run on the newly rendered,animal-named 10.- whatever upgrade. I have even had to reinstall Pro Tools (an industry-wide brand namefor music production), because it was "incompatible" with my newest upgrade;what an inconvenience to say the least!I'm talking about these things at a veryhigh-level, because I don't want to get too "bogged down in the weeds" intechnical-speak that will fly over most folks heads and become a meaninglessdiscussion on how one perceived problem, isn't a problem on the other, or canbe easily addressed on that system, or how one is intrinsically "better" thanthe other like you might find on some other blogs; if that is what you werelooking for... so sorry for you. Here at 2BrosShow.com, I just want people tofeel comfortable making music. My personal preference is the MAC platform(probably could've guessed that by now) but it's my choice mostly because mytime at Berklee College of Music. When we (the general student body) werelearning about, asking/answering questions about, or creating and doing music production...it was always on a MAC. Before that I was on a PC, but quickly found that forme... Plug & Play was the way, and since then I have kept with it. I know abunch of folks that have stayed exclusively with either or, and some (like me)that went from PC to MAC... but I don't know basically anyone (and I say "basically"because you should never say never), who went from MAC to PC. To me, thatspeaks volumes!     [if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE


Send Blog   ·     Share on Facebook   ·     Bookmark on Delicious

   

3 Quick Secrets to Uncovering the Best D.A.W. for YOU!

Producers ask me constantly about what DAW(Digital Audio Workstation) they'll need to master in order to get pro resultswhen they produce music, record it, & mix it.Do you know what I tell them? There are probably two of them... Wantto guess what they are? They are the ones that will aid you to produce music,and the ones that will record/edit it well (albeit for you and your needs, theymight be the same system).Music Production is a funny thing because it encompasses alittle bit of so many of the creative aspects of music AND technology. So whenchoosing a DAW, the first "secret" (which is hardly a secret, lol)... youwill need: 1.   Pro Tools (or more aptly, you'll need to knowHOW it works and WHAT it can do). Youwill need to know its functionalities, its varying capabilities, and all of itsmany uses in music recording and engineering. It remains an industry standardamong all major and mid-level studios for recording and editing... meaning... notknowing it will leave you basically in the proverbial "dust". "But, I can't afford PRO TOOLS! It's like... several thousanddollars, right?"Yes, & No. Pro tools and its supporting hardware, comes inmany iterations (Express, LE, HD, TDM) and they can be purchased and varyingprice points. They are still very functional at every price, and will work formany different kinds of studios, or even a basic laptop production set up.My gripe with Pro Tools is (and please "every engineer on theplanet", don't throw me under the jail for blasphemy)... though it isamazing for editing and recording, I've found that the music productionfunctionality is really lacking. Though I do know folks that use it forproduction, in general I think it is very complex and can be down-rightdifficult to use because of its huge learning curve as compared to other DAWs;it's just not very intuitive. That means... for the average music producer who isinterested in just CREATING music, it just may not be very practical. That bringsus back to the starting question, "How do you find what is the BEST DAW foryou." Whether you just want to have a home-based studio for part timeuse and income, a thriving production house in a small, rented, commercialspace, or a fully functional HD quality recording facility with all thetrimmings... As far as making music (not just recording or mixing it) you WILLneed to think of: 2.   Thelast thing you want it to do for you. What I mean is this. It's very common to grow into your studio or production set up,so you may have started with something as simple as Cool Edit (pretty oldschool), and want to grow into something as much more powerful, like Cubase.But if you are thinking about where you want to be in 5, 10, or 20 years (orhowever  long/short of a time it wouldtake for you to reach to your maximum potential), then consider what you wantto be doing then, as well as now... and invest in that. In this way, you giveyourself the maximum amount of time to really practice and master the variousattributes that the DAW has to offer. There are many DAW systems for both PC & MAC that areamazing for creating music. Still, one DAW is not that different [functionallyspeaking] from another. They can record, edit, bounce or export in manyformats, work with audio and midi regions, basic plugins, etc. So, once you've becomeproficient at one, you can always find that same type of functionality (albeitpackaged or titled differently) in the other - maybe even with more options orpower.That being said, here is my list of quality DAW systemsthat can't be hated on by anyone (in no particular order)!§  Logic Pro X


Send Blog   ·     Share on Facebook   ·     Bookmark on Delicious