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The Taj Longino show provides you with current news that affects you each and everyday. Taj Longino show also provides you with celebrity interviews, ranging from David Banner to Martin Lawrence. Sin... Read More


 

Taj Longino


https://www.blackvibes.com/tajlongino
 

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Hurricane Irma is literally sucking the water away from shorelines

As a meteorologist, there are things you learn in textbooks that you may never see in person. You know they happen theoretically, but the chances of seeing the most extraordinary weather phenomena are slim to none.This is one of those things - a hurricane strong enough to change the shape of an ocean.Twitter user @Kaydi_K shared this video Saturday afternoon, and I knew right away that even though it looked as though it couldn't be possible, it was absolutely legit."I am in disbelief right now..." she wrote. "This is Long Island, Bahamas and the ocean water is missing!!!"Basically, Hurricane Irma is so strong and its pressure is so low, it's sucking water from its surroundings into the core of the storm.

The wind on Long Island in the Bahamas is from the southeast to the northwest on Saturday. On the northwest side of the island, it would be blowing the water away from the shoreline.
Read full story here: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/capital-weather-gang/wp/2017/09/09/hurricane-irma-is-literally-sucking-the-water-away-from-shorelines


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Caribbean braces for 2nd major hurricane in days as Jose closes in

Battered and reeling from Hurricane Irma, isolated Caribbean islands lacking infrastructure, communications, medical supplies and other essentials prepared to weather another potent hurricane, Jose, as it bore down on the region Saturday.

Jose was headed toward the northern Leeward Islands, which include Antigua and Barbuda, St. Martin and the U.S. and British Virgin Islands, with sustained winds of 145 mph - a Category 4 storm.

Irma already this week left a trail of flooded streets, toppled buildings, uprooted trees, upside-down boats and cars, and residents and visitors scrambling to secure shelter, food and clean water. Many people were looking for ways off the islands.   

Reqd full story here: https://usat.ly/2vVoFy


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Breaking News:  FTC cracks down on social media influencers with settlement

It's a case that could portend danger for social media influencers-and the marketers who work with them.Trevor "TmarTn" Martin and Thomas "Syndicate" Cassell have recently reached a settlement with the Federal Trade Commission for failure to disclose their affiliation with an organization they endorsed online.This is a HUGE STORY! Please read every word here: http://m.prdaily.com/Main/Articles/9e5bfcb9-8d1d-4b1d-9378-8ddc620d1e60.aspx?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=Sendible&utm_campaign=RS


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Equifax, one of the nation's three major credit reporting firms, announced Thursday that its computer systems had been breached, leading to the unauthorized access of Social Security numbers and birthdates of up to 143 million U.S. consumers.

Read the full story here: Credit reporting giant Equifax says data breach could affect 143 million U.S. consumershttp://www.latimes.com/business/technology/la-fi-tn-equifax-data-breach-20170907-story.htm


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Florida governor Rick Scott "GET OUT QUICKLY"

   

Florida governor Rick Scott "GET OUT QUICKLY"

What you need to know nowThe path: Irma is moving through the Caribbean. It's too early to tell whether it will make landfall on the US mainland, but forecasts show it could turn toward Florida over the weekend.The strength: It's currently a Category 5, the highest possible on the hurricane scale. It packs winds of 185 mph, making it one of the most powerful Atlantic storms ever recorded.The emergency preparations: Florida Gov. Rick Scott has declared a state of emergency. Stores are already running out of supplies, like bottled water and hardware.Read the full story here: http://www.cnn.com/2017/09/06/us/irma-florida-latest/index.html


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Russians Have Hacked Dozens Of US Energy Companies, Researchers Say

A hacker group linked to the Russian government has acquired an unprecedented level of access to companies that supply power to the US power grid, a cybersecurity firm says.Symantec, a California-based firm that provides cybersecurity services and worldwide research against online threats, says the group, which it's nicknamed Dragonfly 2.0, may have compromisedmore than a dozen American companies in recent months.Dragonfly - also called Crouching Yeti, or Energetic Bear, depending on which researcher you talk to - was an established hacker group that attacked energy sector targets around the world from at least 2011 until 2014, when it went quiet after its tactics were exposed by public research. Researchers at Symantec have declined to specifically cite Russia as the culprit, though they do say it's a state-sponsored attack. Researchers at other firms, like CrowdStrike and FireEye, have tied Dragonfly to the Russian government."This is the first time we've seen this scale, this aggressiveness, and this level of penetration in the US, for sure," Eric Chien, technical director of Symantec's Security Technology & Response Division, told BuzzFeed News.Source: BuzzFeedNew


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CITY HALL - Late-night partiers would no longer be able to buy one last drink from liquor stores after midnight under a proposal set to be approved next week by the City Council.Ald. Brian Hopkins (2nd) said the measure was designed to reduce public drunkenness in areas of the city that attract revelers reluctant to let the night end.
The measure to ban the sale of wine or liquor containers with less than 25 fluid ounces and beer containers with less than 41 ounces won the unanimous approval of the City Council Committee on License and Consumer Protection Wednesday after several Lakeview residents said they feared leaving their apartments late at night.

Read the full story: https://www.dnainfo.com/chicago/20170831/lakeview/40-ounce-tall-boy-ban-midnight-city-council.am


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AUSTIN, Texas - A federal judge late Wednesday temporarily blocked most of Texas' tough new "sanctuary cities" law that would have allowed police to inquire about people's immigration status during routine interactions such as traffic stops. The law, SB 4, had been cheered by President Donald Trump's administration but decried by immigrants' rights groups who say it could force anyone who looks like they might be in the country illegally to "show papers." The measure sailed through the Republican-controlled Legislature despite months of protests and opposition from business groups who worried that it could cause a labor-force shortage in industries such as construction. Opponents sued, arguing it violated the U.S. Constitution, and U.S. District Judge Orlando Garcia's ruling in San Antonio keeps it from taking effect as planned Friday - allowing the case time to proceed. In a 94-page ruling, Garcia wrote that there "is overwhelming evidence by local officials, including local law enforcement, that SB 4 will erode public trust and make many communities and neighborhoods less safe" and that "localities will suffer adverse economic consequences which, in turn, will harm the state of Texas." "The Court cannot and does not second guess the Legislature," he continued. "However, the state may not exercise its authority in a manner that violates the United States Constitution." Garcia's order suspends the law's most contentious language while suggesting that even parts of the law that can go forward won't withstand further legal challenges. The law had sought to fine law enforcement authorities who fail to honor federal requests to hold people jailed on offenses that aren't immigration related for possible deportation. It also would have ensured that police chiefs, sheriffs and constables could face removal from office and even criminal charges for failing to comply with such federal "detainer" requests.The four largest cities in Texas - San Antonio, Austin, Houston and Dallas- have joined the lawsuit, saying the law is vague and would have a chilling effect on immigrant communities. Their attorneys told Garcia that his ruling could determine if other states pursue copycat measures. Lawyers for the Texas attorney general's office responded that the new law has fewer teeth than Arizona's 2010 "Show Me Your Papers" measure that was partially struck down by the U.S. Supreme Court.Top conservatives say an immigration crackdown is necessary to enforce the rule of law. Republican Gov. Greg Abbott has maintained that only lawbreakers have anything to worry about. On the final day of the legislative session in May, tensions boiled over when Republican state Rep. Matt Rinaldi told Democrats that he had called federal immigration agents to report protesters in the Capitol who held signs saying they were illegally in the country. One Democratic legislator admitted pushing Rinaldi, who responded by telling one Democrat that he would "shoot him in self-defense." The Trump administration has made "sanctuary cities" a target. U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions has threatened to pull federal money from jurisdictions that hinder communication between local police and immigration authorities and has praised Texas' law. source: washington pos


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Just before he hung up the phone with her, Alicia Contreras could hear her father frantically racing around his store, laying down newspaper and lifting the most valuable timepieces to the highest shelves he could reach. Her father had spent almost every day, for nearly 30 years, working at Accu-Tyme, the South Houston clock and jewelry repair store he now owned. If Hurricane Harvey's waters were coming for the store, he would be there to protect it. "Sweetie, I have to call you back!" a frantic Alexander Sung, 64, told his 20-year-old daughter as the waters outside began to rage Saturday evening. He'd call back soon, he promised. After days of torrential rain and fierce floodwaters, officials across Southeast Texas are just beginning to tally the deadly toll taken by Harvey, which has left 30 percent of Houston underwater and thousands of people displaced. As of Tuesday evening, officials believed that at least 22 people across Texas were dead of storm-related causes, a number expected to rise in the coming days and weeks.Thirteen of the fatalities were in Harris County, which includes Houston and was among the areas hit hardest by the storm. That count includes Sung, whose body was found at 2:41 p.m. on Sunday, still barricaded inside his flooded clock shop.Also among the confirmed fatalities was a 52-year-old homeless man in La Marque believed to have drowned in the parking lot of the Walmart he was known to frequent, a 60-year-old who was asleep in her bedroom when an oak tree landed on her mobile home in Porter, and a 30-year veteran of the Houston Police Department who found himself trapped in floodwaters as he made his way into a rescue shift. The officer, Sgt. Steve Perez, 60, had left home about 4 a.m. on Tuesday - despite his wife's pleas that he stay home - in an attempt to find a passable route to his duty station. His body was recovered shortly after 8 a.m. "He laid down his life," said Houston Police Chief Art Acevedo, who grew emotional during a brief afternoon news conference. "He was a sweet, gentle public servant."Officers stood along the chain-link fence outside Perez's home in Porter on Tuesday evening. The neighborhood, like so many others in northeastern Houston, had floodwaters rushing through residential streets. "He was a true peace officer," said Capt. Kenneth Campbell, Perez's supervising officer in the traffic enforcement division. "He could've retired a long time ago, but he didn't. He loved his job." Rescue workers and police officials across the state privately lament that the storm probably has claimed many more lives than they have tallied. Soon enough, the dramatic boat rescues playing out live on cable news will give way to recovery missions. "Unfortunately, when the water goes down and we start going door to door, we're prepared for the number of dead to go up," said Sgt. Tim Cromie of the Dickinson Police Department, which as of Tuesday afternoon had confirmed at least three storm-
related deaths in the town of 19,000. "Although, we hope that it won't."Across the hardest-hit counties, hundreds of people remain unaccounted for. In many of those cases - officials hope the majority of them - residents are listed as missing because power outages and dead cellphones have kept them from checking in with loved ones. But in at least some of those cases, rescue workers know, the missing will soon join the list of victims. Among the yet-to-be-confirmed deaths are six members of the Saldivar family - Manuel and Belia Saldivar, both in their 80s, teenagers Devy and Dominic, 8-year-old Xavier and 6-year-old Daisy - who were attempting to flee a flash flood when the van they were riding in was submerged in water, according to Ric Saldivar, who is one of the elder Saldivars' sons. The group had piled into a family van being driven by Sammy Salvidar, 56, one of Ric's brothers, on Saturday night as the nearby Halls Bayou began to flood.As they approached the bridge at Green River Drive, Sammy saw that it was covered in water. However, according to Ric Saldivar, they kept driving, because the guardrails were still showing. But the road dipped sharply on the other side of the bridge, he said. Suddenly, the van was floating and taking on water. Sammy Salvidar, the driver, squeezed out of a window and clung to a tree branch. No one else made it out of the van. "He was yelling at the kids to climb out of the back of the van; I'm sure they couldn't reach it," said Ric Saldivar, relaying the narrative provided to him by Sammy. "He could hear the kids screaming, but couldn't push the doors open. That's what he keeps hearing in his head. And the van just went underwater and was gone."The Harris County Sheriff's Office confirmed that it rescued Sammy Saldivar from floodwaters on Greens Bayou in East Houston. A sheriff's department spokesman told The Washington Post that deputies could not find the van and that the area was still too flooded for a search-and- rescue mission. Flooding has prevented many county medical examiners from being able to conduct autopsies on most of the bodies they have recovered so far. As of Tuesday evening, Harris County officials had conducted only one autopsy - that of the clock fixer. Contreras said her father had worked with clocks for most of his life, learning the trade from his father, a clockmaker, when he was a 13-year-old living in China. The youngest of five brothers, Sung followed his siblings to the United States in his 20s, then attended college and began working for clock-repair shops in the Houston area. The brothers decided to open Accu-Tyme together, but before long, Sung was its owner and primary employee.
He did enlist his daughters, Contreras and her 19-year-old sister, to help out with shifts at the store when they weren't in school and to join him each Sunday to burn incense at the Taoist temple downtown. Contreras described her father as a funny but quiet man who would listen during family dinner as his daughters recounted the details of their days, teasing that their chatter was "an endless recording that just keeps going and going." If either daughter came to the table quiet, he would quickly inquire why. "What's wrong?" Contreras recalled him asking with a tease. "You two never stop talking, so I know something must be wrong." Sung had spent much of Saturday checking in with Contreras, who is a junior at Texas State University, and her sister. The coming storm, he had been warned, could turn deadly. So Sung wanted to know that his girls were safe. After checking in by text message for most of the day, Contreras finally called her father around midnight, after she finished a double shift at the Austin-area hospital where she works. He was at the shop, insisting he would be all right. He had to go. The waters were rising. About 20 minutes later, a text message flashed across the screen of her cellphone. "I love you sweetie," Sung assured his daughter. "You guys are all I have." He promised he would call soon. The call never came. As the night stretched on, fresh waves of rain feeding the raging floodwaters, Contreras began to worry. She and her sister sent text messages, and they called the clock shop. They begged the police, and later their aunts and uncles, to find their father. He had not checked in for hours, and the quiet, they knew, meant something must be wrong.source: washington pos


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The situation in Houston remains dire, as dams begin overflowing with rains that have already wrought catastrophic damage and swept away thousands of homes, leaving the city's residents trapped with limited recourse for shelter and no hope for evacuation. Fortunately, a brave journalist like ABC World News Tonight anchor Tom Llamas is entrenched right there on the scene, bearing witness to the many desperate people who are reduced to stealing food from supermarkets, and ensuring their stories get told directly to the cops. Llamas, who has previously won awards for his coverage of Hurricanes Sandy and Irene, is clearly no stranger to the devastation they can cause or the frenzy they can set off in those who are just struggling to survive within them. But then, he's also not about to let some people just make off with bread or whatever before it can become waterlogged garbage-not without making a purchase. So when Llamas tweeted he was "witnessing looting right now at a large supermarket in the NE part of Houston," adding that police were on the scene after having "just discovered a body nearby," he did his civic duty and immediately informed the police of another dying thing that needed their attention: the public's respect for corporate property. Read the full story here: http://www.avclub.com/abc-news-anchor-reports-on-houston-flood-survivors-stea-1798544648/am


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