The College of Hip-Hop

Send a Message

Blogs RSS


The College Of Hip Hop for
iPhone/iPad


The College Of Hip Hop for
Android


The College Of Hip Hop for
BlackBerry


The College Of Hip Hop for
Amazon


Friends

Big
Heff

Alicia
Heard

Grace
Decker
 

DJ
JOHNNY O

See All Friends (4)


About Me
Welcome to thecollegeofhiphop.org- The # 1 learning platform for entertainment education. You may subscribe to tcohh.org by logging on to the site linked in this app. 

Tcohh.org is proven to accele... Read More


 

The College of Hip-Hop


https://www.blackvibes.com/tcohh
 

My Blog


TCOHH x DJ K Mean

   

TCOHH x DJ K Mean

If female MC's are rare, a female DJ is a unicorn. However, there are exceptions and DJ K Mean of Mean Girls Media is living proof. Rarely do we get to hear the female perspective of the entertainment industry, so TCOHH sat down with the St. Louis, MO native to get her take on everything from what motivated her to pursue a career in the industry to the impact hip-hop has had on the world.TCOHH: Could you introduce yourself to The College Of Hip Hop's audience.
K. M: I'm K. Mean, brand, promotional, marketing, & project management specialist for my company Mean Girlz Media based in St. Louis.  Occasionally, I DJ radio, events & mixtapes too.  TCOHH: What initially attracted you to the entertainment industry? 
K. M: I don't know of one specific thing but for as long as I can remember I've loved music and was organizing childhood family performances with my siblings and cousins.  One day while in high school I looked up jobs and roles in entertainment and decided to specialize in A&R.  Being that isn't as prominent anymore, I've been able to diversify by teaching myself about the business from interning on a street team to having the first music blog covering St. Louis hip hop.  Through travel and relationship building I've been able to carve out a niche and continually build my company.TCOHH: What are your views on the current state of the entertainment industry?
K. M: I believe the business is still alive but that too many people are cutting corners.  Everything is rushed and the end products show it.  It's similar to the difference in when a product is first released as opposed to when it's made quicker and cheaper as demand rises.  It makes business sense but the art suffers.

TCOHH: What is your ideal of success and why?
K. M: I think success is relative.  Not only to the person but also to the place the person is in their life.  Success at 21 is not the same as someone at 35.  Success for me is not static so it's hard to pinpoint because I continually move the goal line.   But I guess the simplest answer is, Peace.  If I'm able to sleep soundly without any worry, I've succeeded.

TCOHH: What advice would you give a young executive looking to enter the entertainment industry?
K. M: Keep Going. Be Patient.  All They Can Say Is No. Money isn't the only thing that matters.  Learn Balance.  Take Risks.

TCOHH: How do you feel under education or miss education has hurt artist with in urban entertainment? 
K. M: Urban entertainment is not much worse off than other demographics as far as business knowledge goes.  It just seems worse because the products aren't as widely accepted so there's less money and the flaws are easier to see.  In both cases, sometimes the bad business is a lesson.  Our problem is that urban acts rarely learn the lesson and repeat the cycle.

TCOHH: How do you feel hip hop culture has impacted the world on a positive and negative level? 
K. M: The culture has been able to give a real voice to disenfranchised people worldwide.  I don't think the negative impact is a result of hip hop.  The culture is a response to the circumstances of the people.  Once the circumstances change, so will the culture.  Every part of Hip Hop is about rebellious expression.  It's blamed for things that it did not create only because those stories are reaching people that are not born in it.  

TCOHH: How do you feel about how women are treated and portrayed in the industry?
K. M: I am indifferent.  I do think I am often underestimated and overlooked because of my sex and low key demeanor but I also think that you get from people the energy you give.  Many women make the mistake of starting off a certain way and then are upset when they can't shake that public perception.  Regardless of sex I strongly believe in working hard, remaining consistent, and staying the course.


Send Blog   ·     Share on Facebook   ·     Bookmark on Delicious

   

10 Steps to Profit from your Passion Chapters 1-5 audio book review

Head over to the seminar section to hear chapters 1-5 of the audio version of "10 Steps to Profit from your Passion"

Book Review: 10 STEPS TO PROFIT FROM YOUR PASSION (Pt. 1)By The College of Hip Hop.orgBy Lisa EarlyIn '10 Steps to Profit from your Passion', The College of Hip Hop (TCOHH), provides readers with tens tips that can help anyone, from artist to CEO, take their dreams to the next level. The first three steps - Invest in Your Dreams; Setting Goals and Creating a Budget - set the foundation of any good business plan. Regardless of the of whether you're an artist looking to get signed or an aspiring entrepreneur these three steps are paramount."...if you want people to invest in your dreams, invest in yourself first!"Once the people who have the power to push your career to the next level see that you are serious and willing to invest in yourself they will have no problem getting behind you because you have already proven that you're willing to go above and beyond to achieve your dreams. And don't be alarmed by that term "invest". Many people tend to think of large sums of money when it comes to investing, but an investment in yourself could simply mean purchasing material for a vision board. Vision boards are useful in that they allow you to identify exactly what your dream is and the best way to see in to fruition. "In life, to even chase after our dreams, we have to set goals."A wise man once said, "A goal without a plan is just a dream". It is important to set rational goals that are obtainable. To do this you must first think about your "ultimate goal", and from this goal make smaller ones that will help you reach your larger goal.Part of rational goal setting is to make sure you set a time frame for accomplishing the goal. It's also important to expand those goals, as you complete each goal, set more that will help you reach your "ultimate goal". This is a good tip because setting goals puts things into perspective, which makes reaching your dreams that much more attainable."It takes money to make money."The worst thing you can say when asked about your budget is: "I don't have a budget" as it shows you either don't have the money for a budget or that you don't know how to create a budget, which both can cause red flags.Like with setting goals, it is important to be realistic when you are setting a budget. And it isn't enough just to developed a budget, you'll actually have to stick to it to reap the benefits. You'll see that as your amount of income increase you'll need to increase tour budget as well."A big part of declining music sales can be attributed to the availability of music for free... You must always set the expectation that your music is for sale.


Send Blog   ·     Share on Facebook   ·     Bookmark on Delicious

TCOHH x DJ DDT

   

TCOHH x DJ DDT

DESMOND "DJ DDT" TRAVISAs a music producer, DJ and audio mixer engineer Desmond "DJ DDT" Travis got his start in the industry at the tender age of nine. The mastermind behind local hits, such as Simple Night Groove and Nighttime Escape DDT has earned a name for himself not only as a DJ, but as a photographer as well. In an exclusive interview with The College of Hip Hop he opened up about How he got his star in the industry and offers advice to those looking to purse a similar path.

TCOHH: Could you introduce yourself to The College Of Hip Hop's audience.
DJ DDT: My name is Desmond "DJ DDT" Travis
TCOHH: What initially attracted you to the entertainment industry?
DJ DDT: That's kind of a hard question to answer, but I'd have to say seeing my older brothers playing in bands when I was a very young kid. Also, reading the credits on the back of album covers and the end credits at the end of movies.

TCOHH: What are your thoughts on the current state of the entertainment industry?
DJ DDT: The entertainment industry is not in a completely bad sate, but we're in a state where we don't physically own anything. It's all virtual: the music is streamed to us. The movies and shows are streamed to us. We don't own vinyl, CDs, cassettes, DVDs or reel film...let alone digital files on our electronic storage devices. To me, that says a lot.

TCOHH: What is your ideal of success and why?DJ DDT: Success is loving and enjoying where you are in your life. I think that way because enjoying life should be more important than obtaining materials, looking for them to improve how you feel.

TCOHH: What advice would you give a young executive looking to enter into the entertainment industry?
DJ DDT: I'd tell anyone looking to get into the entertainment industry to do extensive research and know exactly what you're stepping into. Also, prepare to lose tons of sleep and to be stressed beyond measure. Also, learn how to be a dick...and when to use the knowledge of being a dick.

TCOHH: How do you feel under education or miss education has hurt artist with in urban music?
DJ DDT: Under-education and miseducation can hurt you in a number of ways. Moreover, it can have you wide open to being taken advantage of. Know that being educated doesn't mean 4 years at an Ivy League institution, though. You can learn so much just by reading books and watching YouTube.
TCOHH: How do you feel hip hop culture has impacted the world on a positive and negative level?
DJ DDT: Hip Hop has positively affected the world in so many ways. We've shown the world our views from the ghetto, before the internet. We've shown the world how to use, first, the English language and other spoken languages of the world, in bold, new ways. We've set trends in fashion, attitudes, thought processes, etc... Negatively, we've shown the world lots of ignorant ways. I don't want to expound on them because I want to be one to uplift our people and, in turn, uplift others.
TCOHH: How has the Detroit rap market changed over the years?
DJ DDT: The Detroit rap community has changed by melding with the rest of the Hip-Hop community in The States. The internet has brought our worlds so much closer together


Send Blog   ·     Share on Facebook   ·     Bookmark on Delicious

TCOHH x Nametag Alexander,

   

TCOHH x  Nametag Alexander,

Nametag Alexander, or simply Nametag, is an up and coming Detroit artist with roots on both the east and the west sides of the city. Having been featured on Slum Village's "Dirty District" compilation album and Black Milk's "Sound of the City, Vol. 1" and "Broken Wax EP", Nametag has earned a reputation as one of Detroit's best and brightest young voices. In addition to being featured on multiple compilations and mixtapes, Nametag also gained momentum with his own LP and mixtape "The Name is Tag" and "For Namesake", and in 2010 started his own label imprint Lead And Be Legendary (LABL). In an exclusive interview Nametag sat down with The College of Hip Hop to discuss being featured on the Slum Village compilation, how he got the name Nametag, and what he wants people to take away from his music.

How'd you come up with the name "Nametag"?
I hadn't actually come up with the name. A cousin of mine actually coined that name for me back in like '99 early 2000. It was random, and them just thinking left.

What do you want people to take away from your music?
I want people to take away from my music, especially my latest music...motivation to make something of themselves, and the inspiration to create something that exceeds them.

What was it like working with Slum Village?
I hadn't exactly worked with Slum Village on any music, but I featured on their Dirty District 1 compilation back when I was in the rap group, Ten Speed and Brown Shoe. That opportunity in itself was very dope though. I was in high school then, and a super fan at the time of SV, so I thought I had jumped out the gym being on that compilation.

What other artists have you worked with?
Other artists I have worked with have been, Skyzoo, Guilty Simpson, Black Milk, Nameless, Chell, Miz Korona, Jahshua Smith, Red Pill, Mahd, Quest MCODY, Jamal Bufford, Black Bethoven, the whole Cold Men Young camp, Doc Illingsworth....this will be all day, if I tried to think of every name lol, but the collab game is strong.

What projects are you currently working on?
The project I'm currently working on is an EP with producer, Black Bethoven. It was titled "Sweet Victory" but I'm going to switch it up a bit with the title.

What are some of your long-term goals?
Some of my long term goals are continuing to be a great father, off top. Besides that, establishing a career in the field of music licensing. I want to have a platform to help independent music artists get their music placed in tv, film, etc. I have the Lead And Be Legendary podcast now, so I intend to expand that as a platform.
What do wish you would have known before getting into the music business?
Before getting into the music business, I wish I would have known more about the administrative side, and also having a better understanding of marketing music


Send Blog   ·     Share on Facebook   ·     Bookmark on Delicious

Digital Millennium Copyright Act

   

Digital Millennium Copyright Act

Streaming is changing how music is being received by the masses, which also means streaming will affect the way artist  will be paid. Visit updated resources guide and read the Digital Millennium copyright act of 1998 to be informed 


Send Blog   ·     Share on Facebook   ·     Bookmark on Delicious

TCOHH x Robert Courtney

   

TCOHH x  Robert Courtney

Philanthropist, innovator, and community activist, Robert Cortney is a man of many hats. His desire to invest in people has propelled his vision since 2005. The founder of UNEEK, a program that seeks to bring people together, opened up to The College of Hip Hop about how he got his start in philanthropy, his greatest accomplishments and future endeavors.

How did you get your start in philanthropy?
I started in Philanthropy in 2005 when I bought Uneek Barbershop. I identified a problem with educating the youth in the community, and also a problem with social diversity and we wanted to do our part.

How did you come up with the idea for UNEEK?, Can you explain the message behind the name UNEEK? Unifying Nationalities by Encouraging Education and Knowledge is essentially about bringing people together. We use multiple vehicles to do so including fashion, events and philanthropic efforts.

What services do you offer the community?
Uneek provides haircuts and apparel

What has been your greatest accomplishment?
My greatest accomplishment was receiving the General Motors GMAAN award for my philanthropic entrepreneurial endeavors over the last 8 years.

What are some of your long-term goals?
My long-term goals are to eventually become a full-time consultant helping other startups launch their brands.

Thanks for your time and continue to do great things.


Send Blog   ·     Share on Facebook   ·     Bookmark on Delicious

TCOHH x Lonzo Williams pt 2

   

TCOHH x Lonzo Williams pt 2

Today part two of the exclusive audio interview with the legendary Lonzo Williams of the World Class Wreckin' Crew (@reallonzonwa) and The College Of Hip Hop (@thecollegeofhiphop x @tcohhapp) is available in the seminar section,  listen as he opens up about the NWA days, discovering Mechelle' and a lot of other interesting topics


Send Blog   ·     Share on Facebook   ·     Bookmark on Delicious

TCOHH x Big Heff

   

TCOHH x Big Heff

Quincy Taylor, better known in the entertainment industry as Big Heff, has established himself as a leader in the world of touring and promoting. The vice president of Nerve Djs, Big Heff is also known for his role in the creation of the Ohio Hip Hop Awards & Music Conference as well as numerous other entertainment and hip hop affiliated businesses. In an exclusive interview with TCOHH the CEO of Beyond the Stars Entertainment opens up about how he got his start in the industry, his greatest accomplishments and future endeavors.
Can you explain how you got your start in the industry and what does your position in the industry entitle? 
I worked as an intern for Bone Thugs & Harmony and then started off doing promotions for Landspeed Records they were an underground distribution company and record label based out of Boston, MA big thanks to Mike Moves for giving me an opportunity really looking back and going thru the process of what I do now is Artist Development, Supporting and Development of talent thru traditional media resources radio, television, print media social media, and online placements. Regionally I do a lot of touring to help bring these things to life and create a support system for the artist to take an artist career to the next level. 
What was it like working for Shady Records?
I did a lot of things with Big Proof of D12 and Obie Trice early in their careers. I Still remember being a part of the D12 World Tour to help promote their second album and Obie Trice Cheers Album. This taught me a lot of structure and learning accountability in the music industry, making history each go around and creating a presence in the Midwest that we can hold our own and be elite in the industry.
What sparked the idea for Beyond Stars Entertainment?
After the success of seeing Machine Gun Kelly become a signed and receiving a Gold record on his first single "Wild Boy", I wanted to start something to help get more music out and offer opportunity for up and coming artist from the region. To make our music more available for fans and create more projects. I wanted to have a hub for all the things that I wanted to create from books, television, and music. 
What do you enjoy most about your job?
The greatest thing I enjoy is just working with music, I'm very passionate about it, and its satisfying to work hard, create superstars, and see the results of your music being loved by other people in different regions. Seeing it on television, movies, radio stations, streaming playlist. The partnership becoming the vice president that was created with Nerve Djs definitely created a support system for new music and building the relationship with the Djs and new artist.
What are some of your long-term goals?
Recently I'm a part of a tech startup company called Toyz Nation that specializes in App Development, creating wearable Tech, and creating school programs. Also, start a successful school called National Business & Entertainment Academy, teaching the next generation the business side of the music industry. One Day I can see myself running a healthy digital record label that can incorporate a lot of the things that can once again change the culture. Creating a book series about the music and entertainment industry. 
What has been your greatest accomplishment?
Just becoming a man and growing, writing the "Making It in The Midwest" was really impactful for me to reflect on the things I have learned in the music business. Greatest accomplish is receiving the Lifetime Achievement Award in 2015 at the Ohio Hip Hop Awards for the things I helped create for the music community that I live in


Send Blog   ·     Share on Facebook   ·     Bookmark on Delicious

TCOHH x Lonzo Williams

   

TCOHH x Lonzo Williams

Today part one of the exclusive audio interview with the legendary Lonzo Williams of the World Class Wreckin' Crew (@reallonzonwa) and The College Of Hip Hop (@thecollegeofhiphop x @tcohhapp) is available for your listening pleasure in the seminar section.  Listen as he opens up about the NWA days, discovering Mechelle' and a lot of other interesting topics


Send Blog   ·     Share on Facebook   ·     Bookmark on Delicious

KC of Hood Illustrated x TCOHH

   

KC of Hood Illustrated x TCOHH

Hood Illustrated is undoubtedly the most notarized hip hop magazine representing the Midwest.  With more than ten years of longevity on the media side of the hip-hop game, founder KC, started the publication in response to the lack of media outlets who catered to independent artists. Independent and black owned Hood Illustrated is few of its kind. In a recent interview KC spoke with TCOHH about journalism, publishing and what it takes to make it as a black owned independent media outlet

What Attracted you to journalism?
I was attracted to journalism and publishing due to the lack of exposure for the Midwest hip hop scene.  There was (and still) is a void of hip hop representation for the "Lost Coast" as I would call it.  The Midwest is not known for our media outlet and exposure. Those hubs were primarily based in NY, Atlanta and Los Angeles.  I felt that we weren't represented like we should have and wanted to provide an opportunity for that voice to be heard globally in print and online.  Did you always know that you would one day own and operate your own publication?
The dots did not connect as it pertains to music and publishing but the path had been in the works as I look back on my path. I have always been a hip-hop junkie and am cut from the cloth of the Master P, MC Breed, Rap A Lot and the other brands that had pride in independent hustling out of the trunk.  I initially started in the music business as the Co-Owner of Just 1 Enemy Records with my artist and business partner. I basically ran the full operation independently which built the groundwork for where I am today by handling management, marketing, promotion, distribution, public relations and every other task necessary to run a successful independent record label.  

How did you come up with the concept for HOOD Illustrated?
I did a lot of market research and studied the industry. This was a time when technology begin to be more relevant.  Print publications were beginning to falter and go strictly digital.  I looked at it as an open opportunity to take advantage of this space and create a unique brand that could be recognized and respected by my target market which is Hip Hop Entrepreneurs.  I had tested the market initially with MPV (Midwest Point of View) and it was successful to the point where I had to expand the target market and focus on a global appeal. This was years in advance when I reserved the name and begin the process in protecting and trademarking the brand HOOD Illustrated. From the very beginning I knew it would have the opportunity to be a great starting point if I strategically placed the name accordingly. 

What are some big named artists that have been Featured in HOOD Illustrated?
I am blessed to have interviewed and published some of my favorite artist of all time. I take a lot of pride in being that media outlet that breaks artists and use the platform to let the world know about them. Some notable artist who got some of their early exposure in HOOD Illustrated are Kendrick Lamar and Machine Gun Kelly; breaking them in the Midwest was big. Some notable artist are Tech N9ne, DMX, Freeway Rick Ross, MC Breed, C-Bo, Scarface, Warren G, Tone Trump, Cap 1, Freeway, Nipsey Hussle, Starlito + many more. 

What do you enjoy the most about your job?
I enjoy discovering new talent, Picking the brains of stars and indie artist who are on their grind. HOOD Illustrated has grown a lot over the last 10+ years. I enjoy my position and am humbled with every new opportunity. 

What are your long-term goals (5-10 years)?
Personally; I'd like have the opportunity to set my family up for life off the strength of my brand. lol. Business wise; Getting some corporate contracts and having several streams of income that come from the HOOD Illustrated brand that tap into different industry fields such as Radio, Music, Movies, etc.... 10 years from now I want to have that check that will allow me the option to hang it up and live life stress free. 
As a publication, what is your greatest accomplishment?
My greatest accomplishment is to still be active in 2017 via print; and being able to adapt the initial plan to the new wave of marketing by using media. 

What advice can you offer up-and-coming journalists and entrepreneurs? 
I would encourage entrepreneurs to do research on your trade; create a unique name and brand and have a presence online and network with as many blogs and websites as possible.  Protect that name and brand and come up with a way to generate income off that name.  Everybody is selling some type of merchandise. You can be your own boss and still work or go to school so it makes sense to not throw all your eggs in one basket. Be transparent and don't be afraid to think outside of the box and networking with those who are outside of your comfort zone.  The world is bigger than your neighborhood and city so don't limit your reach by focusing on the minor; be great and focus on being that big deal.  


Send Blog   ·     Share on Facebook   ·     Bookmark on Delicious