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Mr Serv-on X The College of Hip Hop

   

Mr Serv-on X The College of Hip Hop

Head over to the seminar section and check out the audio interview with Mr Serv-on formerly of No Limit Records takes the time out to offer his insight on the music business and also discusses his current plans .


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The Connected Experience Podcast Debut

   

The Connected Experience Podcast Debut

The debut episode of The Connected Experience #podcast -"Dynamic Duos" is now available and touches on debut albums from great #hiphop duo's  #thadoggpound #outkast #cnn #8ballmjg #ugk #mobbdeep #luniz #clipes listen in on a great conversation with host AJ & SJ along with @shoptalkpodcast (@jjohnson313 & @damegonewild) and @nametagalexander of @lablmusic podcast

https://soundcloud.com/tcepodcast/the-connected-experience-dynamic-duos


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10 Steps to Profit from your Passion Chapters 6-10 audio book review

Head over to the seminar section to listen to chapters 6-10 of the audio book.

Book Review: 10 STEPS TO PROFIT FROM YOUR PASSION (Pt. 2)By The College of Hip Hop.orgIn the first installment reviewing 10 Steps to Profit from Your Passion by The College of Hip Hop the reader was introduced to some of the basics of starting a music career or business. In this segment chapters 6 thru 10 will be highlighted. Here, more emphasizes will be placed on the music aspect. So if you're an aspiring artist... lean in."What do I want from the music business?"In order to answer this, one must know the different types of deals that are out there. First up is the infamous "360 Deal". With a 360 deal the label fronts you the money for your album, which you will eventually have to pay back through the money generated from album sales, merchandise, concerts and other forms of revenue. Next, is the Production Deal. With this type of deal the artist may sign directly with a label or producer, who develops the artist and shops around demos. The last deal discussed was the lesser known Pressing and Distribution Deal (P & D Deal). With a deal of this sort the distributer manufactures and ships the album to stores for a commission, usually 25%.When determining what type of deal is best for you TCOHH suggests weighing the pros and cons of signing a record deal, as well as being familiar with the different types of deals."Get an entertainment lawyer." In Chapter 7, Recording Contracts 101 TCOHH starts off by stressing the importance of having a lawyer, and not just any ol' paralegal (no shade to the paralegals out there), but an entertainment lawyer. It's important to have someone in your team who is knowledgeable about the entertainment side of things. Through a few chapters there was a recurring theme of "there is no such thing as a standard agreement".  This is stressed yet again. While agreements maybe similar, there is no cookie cutter template.The last thing you want to do is ball out with the money the label gives you as this may result in you not being able to pay for the production of the album. "No album = No sales", and no sales means you can't pay the label pack the money they fronted you.Before signing a recording contact ask yourself whether or not you should have your entertainment lawyer look it over and who should negotiate contracts on your behalf."Proper packaging creates the perception that you have invested in the projects and it is worth the money."Once you have successfully completed your album you will then need to determine how the product should be packaged. Chapter 8 discusses the importance of good packaging. When determining how to package your project, it's important to ensure that your packaging stands out from the crowd. You'll also want to keep in mind how much of your budget you are willing to spend on packaging."Becoming a start is like running for office - if people don't see the signs promoting you or hears about you through word of mouth from sown one else, YOU LOSE."At some point in your career you will have to determine whether or not you need a street team and when is a right time to do so. Your street team is responsible for getting your name out there, as well as promoting any upcoming projects.Last, but certainly not least, viral content was discussed. In the age of YouTube, Facebook and the other various social media platforms the more views, shares and likes you can get the better. "It's all about the content and emotional connection you create with your fans."While creating viral content van be helpful in launching an artist music career, it is not necessary.10 Steps to Profit from Your Passion is a must read for any up-and-coming artist, as well as aspiring entrepreneurs and CEOs. While the guide has a heavy concentration on the music industry, there's a little bit of something for everyone, whether you're looking to get into the music business or simply want to start a small business.


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TCOHH x Premium Pete

   

TCOHH x Premium Pete

Premium Pete is more than just the sneaker guy. While his IG @SneakerTubeTV is a testament to his early years in hip-hop Pete wants to be known for more than just fly kicks. Formerly of the Combat Jack Show, Pete ventured off on his own to develop his own podcast, the Premium Pete Show. In an exclusive interview with The College Of Hip Hop Pete talks success, podcasting and food.

TCOHH: Explain to The College Of Hip Hop Who Premium Pete is.
PP: Who Premium Pete is, is someone you can't explain in one sentence. Somebody that really just believes in the lifestyle and the culture, and you know, is a dot connector. I've been involved in sneaker culture for many years just collecting them, just being fresh. It's a part of New York City. It's part of just what we do. I remember when I was at an event or something like that and somebody was like 'That's Premium Pete, you know that sneaker guy'. And when they said that shit I don't know why it bothered me. And I was like man I need to work harder so people just don't think of me as the sneaker guy. Sneakers are pieces of conversation. And like yea they're fresh, but keep in mind there are millions of people who don't wear sneakers with the idea of 'Oh I'm wearing Yeezy's' or 'I'm wearing Jordan's'. They're wearing them because they need them on their feet. And I don't know why it bothered me because if someone says to a doctor 'Oh you're that doctor' he's not gonna be like 'Fuck. Why the fuck did he call me a doctor for? I do more than that'. I just felt that I didn't want to be put in one box. And I feel like in this world that happens a lot where you get put in a box. I'm somebody who is involved in, you know, many different cultures and many different lifestyles. I'm a fan, a teacher and a learner of many different lifestyles and the cultures. So, what I did was work very hard to, you know. That's when we really went in with the podcasting and really just became more of a voice. That's when me and Bun started up You Gotta Eat This and really became not just a website and a social push but also like a marketing company. A company that could really push and help build brand awareness for other brands. So now it like 'That's Premium Pete - the Brooklyn kid, or sneaker guy, or from Combat Jack Show or You Gotta Eat This'. And then I was like now were getting somewhere because now we're beginning to grow out all this different facets of myself and that's what I wanted. I didn't want to be known as just one person.

TCOHH: What was it like growing up in NY during the 80s and 90s hip-hop era?
PP: It really was a life style, you know. hip-hop is a lifestyle. Some people think hip hop is just music. Nah, hip-hop is the way we dress, the way we walk, our mannerisms, our everything. I feel like it's the birth place of hip -hop, the mecca. I think people were just living the lifestyle not even knowing that hip-hop is more than just music. I think at that time it was more of a fad, people thought it would go away. Nobody ever thought that hip hop was forever. They figure country music, rock music, and heavy metal is forever. People from the 80s and 90s - I feel you have to thank them for pushing the culture forward and putting their stamp on something they didn't think would last forever. But it was special. NYC is tough. People really lived that shit. That's why I think people get mad about lyrics and everything like that, because the originators and forefathers of hip-hop really lived what they were spitting.

TCOHH: How did you come up with the idea for You Gotta Eat This?
PP: Me and Bun we talk a lot on the phone a lot. For years, we've had conversations about everything. Probably I would say nothing to do mostly with hip-hop, but more so everything around it and the lifestyles of hip-hop. We talked about movies and food, and different restaurants. Bun travels a lot, so he does a lot of different shows and concerts. Bun is very passionate, so he would call me all the time and tell me like 'Oh my god man I was in Germany and they had these meatballs... Pete listen'. Bun is a person who is a chameleon. He can adapt to any situations, and obviously with me being Italian we tap fun at the mannerisms and more so the verbiage of how Italians talk, so we would say things like 'This pizza? forget about it. It's amazing'. And one day we were like we should start like a blog and call it You Gotta Eat This. Kinda like 'Hey Steve man you ever had this clam sauce from Vermont?'. It's amazing, you gotta eat this. It's basically like a co-sign. So, it was just through conversation. There are so many people that I talk to and I have good conversations with, but I would say 9 out of those 10 things never happen, but that was one that did. 

TCOHH: What is your idea of success, and why?
PP: That's a good question because success to most people is money, and for many years that was my thoughts and that's not really true. Success is being happy on your own terms, and if you find something you love and that makes you really happy then that's success. I think most people see success as a Rolex watch or a lot of followers on Instagram. Or success is dressing in brand name designer clothes. But for me success is seeing my kids get the best out of life and being able to provide that for them. Success to me is doing what you love every day. Success is whatever you think is success, but I think what happens is people look at other people's success for what they are doing wrong. I say look at it as inspiration for what you're doing right. Being successful is a continuing process of doing had work and enjoying the results. It's not one thing. Like my friend Dallas always says 'If you do one great thing you gotta do another'.

TCOHH: What advice can you offer someone looking to get into the podcast business?
PP: (Jokingly) Don't do it. No, I'm just kidding. In this day and age be different. For example, say it was a time when you were the only one wearing Victoria's Secret out in Detroit, then all of a sudden everyone is wearing it. And you're like 'Damn man everyone is wearing it'. That happens in everything. I know a lot of people that are like 'I wanna start a podcast, but everyone is doing it'. It happens with every single fucking thing. The thing is when it gets saturated that when you need to get creative. So, to anyone doing podcasting now, I would say be consistent, be real, be passionate, and be yourself. That would be the biggest advice I would give people


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TCOHH x Missy Talbot

   

TCOHH x Missy Talbot

Director and producer Missy Talbot has earned stripes on both the stage and small screen. With the production hit televisions shows, such as Cheaters and Switchplay Live under her belt combined with theatrical productions, like Eyes of Deception and Karl King's When a Woman Loves and There Goes the Neighborhood Talbot has carved a lane for herself in both worlds and made a name for herself in the entertainment industry. Check out the exclusive Q&A below.Tell me a little about how you got your start in television and theatre. My start was with Okane Media Group in 2000 with Miles Dixon and Nate Talbot.What advice can you offer to someone looking to pursue a similar path?Research Everything.  Keep up to date with what's hot and trending and study.  But most importantly it's nothing like experience.  Intern, understudy, and never stop learning.  Watch who you associate yourself with, be protective of your name.What's the most challenging aspect of your job?Getting everyone to stick to their word and contracts that they sign.  It's always one or two out of the bunch that causes problems.  Not sticking to schedule etc., but usually God works it all out.  "Get It Done" is our motto.What has been your greatest accomplishment?Turning dreams into reality.  I love watching a product go from off the page into full production.  It brings everything to life.Which do you like best, theatre or television?I've had many great moments.  I can't really pinpoint one specific thing.  This now gives me something to think about.What are some of the similarities and differences between theatre and television?Similarities: Casting, bringing characters to life, script editing, character development and marketing.Differences:  Rehearsal time, production schedules, talent level, the size of the team that's needed and financial obligation.Which do you enjoy most, theatre or television?I truly love them equally BUT there's nothing like that live, instant reaction from an audience in theater.  With film and television, you have to wait for ratings, feedback, comments, etc.  versus when you do theater you are watching the tears, the laughs, and people leave telling you how they felt.  But I just love "quality" entertainment.  


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Maddog McGraw Ep Review

   

Maddog McGraw Ep Review

Maddog McGraw: Green Beret Review
This 8 track ep opens up with the track "Rebels don't die" which takes you thru the experience of Maddog surviving an actual heart attack. Spending time at a Detroit Tigers game, enjoying the atmosphere when suddenly tragedy strikes, missing a concert the next day in Detroit due to the fact he had a heart attack at the game. The track is a battle with Maddog and the grim reaper, a fight that Maddog seems to win, hence the title "Rebels don't die". Followed by a what I believe is one of the strongest songs on the ep " I Hate Your Guts", this track is a hate filled ode to the feelings he has towards his enemies. With lines like " From the bottom of my heart I wish you the worst, if you die tomorrow I'm car jacking your hearse" shows the harsh feelings he has for the people who've become enemies. Over all "Green Beret" deserves attention and fans won't be disappointed after listening. "Green Beret" ends on a very high note with the track "High Noon". This track simply lets the competition know that in any form of a one on one battle that don't stand a chance against Maddog McGraw. 
SJ 


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Jack Thriller x TCOHH pt 2

   

Jack Thriller x TCOHH pt 2

We hear stories all the time about artist - urban artist in particular - who basically got "got" - whether it be due to the mismanagement of funds, bad contracts or what have you. A lot of this can be contributed to a lack of financial literacy and business savvy. What are your thoughts on the mis-education of artists and how this hurts their careers?When I was coming up and I was looking for managers and stuff like that I would sign any damn thing. I just wanted to be famous, and I wanted to make some money and whatnot. And when you''re young and desperate and shit, and you ain''t got no money you just wanna get on you like: ''I''ll figure all that other shit out later. Because once I''m famous I can gon'' and pick up the pieces and make money off my fame. How long is my contract? I''mma be famous forever''. That''s how you think when you inside of it, but that''s not really how it goes because sometimes when you get in that certain space and you realize that you''re supposed to have this and you don''t have that and somebody who started off at the same time as you they do have the fruits of their labor because they did better business than you. You will feel salty and you would start being bitter and stop working and being creative because you can''t function inside the industry and you''ll start to resent it. So, it''s very important to get your business together and understand the business right off the rip, or just stay independent, man. Cuz like I said, they making it so easy for you to do it by yourself now. Back in the day when you had TLC and stuff, they wanted to be famous, and it cost. But they didn''t care and they didn''t educate themselves on the business until they were hanging around other people who were just as famous as them and they was like ''Girl you ain''t got no house? You still got a roommate?'' You don''t be knowing no better. Somebody could be giving you a check for $100,000 and you pick up some cash from party to party and you doing features and stuff and picking up $25,000 here and $25,000 there in cash, and you''re thinking you''re rich already, like: ''This will hold me off until the big check comes in'', but when the big check comes in you didn''t realize how much stuff you had signed away and that''s when you start feeling salty. A lot of people would say that them girls was stupid, but no they weren''t. Anybody would have did that, especially if people had said to you ''You know what? If you don''t sign this we can find three other girls.'' That could have been anybody. TLC could have been anybody. What has the transition been like going from being a solo host on This Is 50 to now having a full staff on Party and Bullshit?It''s very liberating. I don''t have to ask nobody - I don''t have to ask 50 what he think about it. ''Can I have this person up there or that person?'' because he don''t get along with them or no bullshit like that. Because I''m not in no gang. I''m a comedian. I ain''t supposed to be not liking nobody because the dude I''m working with not liking somebody. That''s some bullshit, right? I remember one time I tried to shake Rick Ross hand - that nigga looked at my hand like he wanted to spit in it. It ain''t have nothing to do with me and I thought that was so unfair. And I couldn''t be on the episode of "Wild ''n Out" that he was on because he didn''t want me on there. I didn''t do anything to this guy, but guilty by association. But it don''t go that way when I have beef with somebody. Like me and 2 Chains had got into it. I was like ''Ay 50, you betta tell that nigga 2 Chains that I ain''t fucking playing with him''. So, he call the nigga up, the next thing I know they doing a song together. I''m like ''What the fuck? Yea, let me gon and start my own shit.'' I''m glad I got my own stuff and I''m trying to create more platforms for more people to get on. I''m married now. My wife is my co-host on the show and we''re doing a podcast with Tidal called "Funny and Fine". We have a show called "16 or Better", for up-and-coming emcees. I''m just trying to create my own brands. It''s very important to be your own man and create your own lane. It''s way more rewarding. Because one thing I''ve always hated is when I''m out in the street and somebody points to me and goes: "Ay there go the 50 Cent nigga right there". I wanna be Jack.How do you balance married life and your career in entertainment?I''m still trying to figure it out. It''s hard because before I was married I was super far away from being married. Suuupppper! Like people don''t even believe I''m married. I''ve been married for about four months now and I still got women texting me and hitting her in her DMs and trying to see if we really together and stuff. It''s very frustrating. And I didn''t even realize how many hoes I had before I got married. I kid you not, it''s been over 60 something girls, different ones curse us out and all type of shit. So, how do I balance it? My fans. A lot of my fans didn''t want me to be married. They wanted Jack "The Sex Room" dude that interview the porn stars and have all the girls and stuff. They were living through me. Now that I got my wife, I try to find a balance to where I can give the people what they want without disrespecting my wife. She learning how to deal with it too because on the flip side of that now that I''ve made her famous a lot of guys be trying to hit her up on the low cuz they think ''Well shit, if she out here and married a nigga with one eye I know she''ll like me'', but that''s not the case. Usually when you see a woman dating a man with one eye or one leg.... If he got her that mean he really got her and you ain''t got not one chance in the world. It''s pretty extreme. It''s something over there that you''ll never understand. Leave that shit alone. 


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Jack Thriller x TCOHH pt 1

   

Jack Thriller x TCOHH pt 1

Jack Thriller has come a long way since Soulja Boy''s 2007 hit "Crank That (Superman)". After years of being the face of This Is 50.com, the comedian has created a lane of his own during his rise from the stage of the Chris Tucker Comedy Club to our TV screens on Nick Cannon''s Wild ''N Out. A recent newlywed, host of The Sex Room and Party and Bullshit, Jack sat down with TCOHH to talk about marriage, his transition from This is 50 and his upcoming album, and podcast on Tidal.Tell us a little bit about yourself and how you got your start in entertainment?I''ve been in the entertainment industry since I was 12 years old. I had been going to performing arts camps in Huntsville, Alabama and Montgomery, Alabama and I then joined a gospel play called "A Will to Survive" starring Fred Berry from the TV show "What''s Happening". He played the character Rerun. I then left there and came back to Atlanta, GA to pursue a career in comedy. So, I started off at the Chris Tucker Comedy Club and there were a lot of greats and stuff - Bruce Bruce, Earthquake, of course Chris Tucker, Mike Epps. Everybody that''s big names now - Kat Williams. After that I started going on the road with Lil Duval, Roland Powell was his name at the time. I became his roommate, opening act, bodyguard, personal assistant.... anything that I had to do to just sponge up the game because he was already doing well. This was like 2001 at the time and we use to shoot a bunch of skits. Matter fact we was the first ones doing skits before any of these other little YouTube sensations or Instagram sensations. We started all of that. What comedians would you say inspired your comedic career?Richard Pryor. I love Richard Pryor as a comedic actor. I never really was into his standup like that. I really love Eddie Murphy. I seen "The Best of Eddie Murphy" when I was five years old. I''ll never forget it. I think I was in kindergarten at the time, and I understood everything that was going on. It was like 1986, ''87 and I was watching that shit and I was like "I think that''s what I am right there. I''m a comedian". When I said I was gonna do this shit before I went to the Chris Tucker Comedy Club I went to go see the Kings of Comedy in 1998 or something like that. I went to 2 shows back to back. And one of the local DJs, named Ryan Cameron, opened up for them and I was like ''''Shit if  Cameron can do this, I can do this''''. He was kind of funny, but he wasn''t like crazy funny. It wasn''t nuts, he made me feel like I could do it. Now you know when a comedian is good and you respect him you''re like ''''Nah, I can''t do this shit''''. Like Dave Chappell or Chris Rock, he''ll make you say ''''I can''t do that shit'''' because it''s so great, it''s so groundbreaking, and when I say groundbreaking, it''s like you ain''t never heard none of this shit before. Jamie Foxx is like that too. And I think he''s dope because he''s an entertainer. He sings and he plays instruments and stuff and it takes you to a whole other place. It ain''t even like you watching a comedy show, it''s like you''re watching a concert. A lot of people have been very vocal about the entertainment industry, especially in regards to hip-hop - some of it positive, some of it negative. What are your thoughts on the current state of not just hip-hop, but the entertainment industry in general?I think it''s in an interesting place right now because you ain''t even gotta be good no more. Your grand mama could blow up. Look at that girl what''s her name...? Mama Dee - and Jim Jones mama too. It can happen, like easily. Like you don''t have any choice not to make it in 2018. It ain''t no excuse for you saying niggas is hating and they ain''''t putting you on. The gatekeepers are gone, we are the gatekeepers now. It''s homeless people with Facebook, Instagram and the access to the internet and whatnot, and your life could change overnight. So, if you don''t at least take incentive to at least record yourself and post it up, you don''t deserve to make it. So, I like it in that sense, but on the same token the curse of that is the people that produce quality stuff don''t get a chance to see the light of day sometimes people aren''t paying to go see them... The record sales are horrible. It''s a new kind of system that makes it hard to monetize it the way you use to be able to monetize the game. So, I think that''s where the conflict comes in at. I don''t think the music today transcends. When I say that, I mean, I''m 35. In 15 years, I''ll be 50. I don''t think I''m gonna be listening to "Look at My Dab". I was at a cookout the other day with some old folks, I was like the youngest one there. I think the oldest person there was like 56. And they were listening to like Kendrick''s album and stuff. And Kendrick''s album is good, but I felt like they were trying to be young and shit. When I''m around older people I want to hear mature older music - 90''s at the least. 


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